Severe Tropical Cyclone Evan was considered to be the worst tropical cyclone to affect the island nation of Samoa since Cyclone Ofa in 1990 and Cyclone Val in 1991. The system was first noted on December 9, as a weak tropical depression about 700 km (430 mi) to the northeast of Suva, Fiji. Over the next couple of days the depression gradually developed further before it was named Evan on December 12. The storm moved east and impacted the French islands of Wallis and Futuna before affecting Samoa and American Samoa. The system then slowed down and sat on the Samoan Islands for eighteen hours with wind gusts of up to 210 km/h (130 mph) (Source: Tropical Cyclone Activity Report – Pacific / Indian Oceans). After circling Samoa, Evan turned back and headed towards Fiji.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclone_Evan

On December 16, Evan paralleled the western areas of Fiji. Upon passing over Fiji, over 8,000 people were living in shelters, including many tourists. Although there were no initial reports of casualties, the storm brought considerable damage. Trees and power lines were down across the island group. In addition, flooding and structural damage was reported from resorts and homes. Damage throughout Fiji amounted to FJ$169.9 million (US$108.8 million). Additionally, short-term economic losses related to the cyclone were estimated reach FJ$73.4 million (US$40.9 million).

The track of Cyclone Evan – (Source: The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs)

When the storm hit the islands of Samoa, it strangely circles the Samoan island of Upolu and slows down for an eighteen hour stay (Source: Tropical Cyclone Activity Report – Pacific / Indian Oceans & http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyclone_Evan). For this reason, Cyclone Evan was considered to be the worst tropical cyclone to affect the island nation of Samoa since Cyclone Val in 1991. Also, note that here is almost nothing but ocean for 1000 kilometers. It is very unusual that the storm slowed down and circled the Samoan Islands.

After the storm circles the Samoan Islands it seems to target the most populated island group in the region, the Fijian Islands, 1000 kilometers away. When Evan finally reaches Fiji it intensifies to its highest peak, a category five cyclone. Note the changes in storm intensity on the source below from Australian Severe Weather.

http://www.australiasevereweather.com/tropical_cyclones/2012_2013/oper/tropical_cyclone_evan.htm

Below is an article from the Sydney Morning Herald labeled “Eye of the Storm”. The document further confirms the changes in storm intensity. Note at which point Cyclone Evan hits category 4 & 5, the Fijian Islands.

Newspaper Article – Eye of the Storm – Tuesday, December 18th 2012, Sydney Morning Herald

Cyclone Evan Track

Cyclone Evan looks to me like an attack storm. If you look at Cyclone Evan on the oceanic map below you will realize how unbelievable and questionable the storm really is.

Oceanic Map – Please note the islands of Samoa and Fiji and the fact that they are 1100 kilometers apart. Also note that Samoa, Fiji and Tonga are the most populated island groups in the area, disregard the others. Draw the track of the storm on the Oceanic Map. Compare the distance between Samoa and Fiji to somewhere in the world that you are familiar with. What are the odds of a storm with a path like this? What are the odds of the storm slowing down on Samoa and then circling Samoa? What are the odds of the storm hitting its highest peak (category 5) on Fiji after slowing down and circling Samoa?

To get a further understanding of why I believe this storm is an attack, read and compare the following to somewhere in the world your familiar with (Samoa and Fiji are 1000km apart).

  • Cyclone Evan is like a cyclone starting out in Bourke, moving towards Brisbane then slowing down and circling Brisbane at category 3 intensity and then moving towards and hitting Sydney at category 5 intensity.
  • Cyclone Evan is like a cyclone starting out in Pittsburgh, moving towards Ottowa and then slowing down and circling Ottowa at category 3 intensity and then moving towards and hitting Washington DC at category 5 intensity.
  • Cyclone Evan is like a cyclone starting out in Munich, moving towards London and then slowing down and circling London at category 3 intensity and then moving towards and hitting Berlin at category 5 intensity.

The unbelievable and questionable nature of Cyclone Evan, makes Evan very suspicious and if Evan was manufactured it would be a direct attack on Samoa and Fiji. Is someone testing their weather modification capabilities on Samoa and Fiji? Unfortunately, like Hurricane Sandy, the people effected by Cyclone Evan have no one to blame. The questionable nature of Evan should at very least justify further scientific research and if Evan was manufactured, think about the mentality of the country manufacturing it. What military advantage can be gained by wiping out the island nations of Samoa and Fiji? It is very disturbing that anyone with the power to wield hurricanes and cyclones would wipe out the island nations of Samoa and Fiji.